Sunday, April 7, 2019

Losing Your Mom is Rough, But...

I think we all understand that we're going to die someday. We also should understand that our loved ones will also die. There are several people in our lives that we don't want to see go, and I am sure the death of a child is the worst to have to deal with. Parents and siblings, too. But again, it's going to happen. That's why I was little surprised at the sports reporting on a local news channel from Georgia.




Tom Crean lost his mom the day before he coached a game. That's unfortunate. I like Tom Crean because he used to coach one of the teams I kind of followed back in Milwaukee. Marquette, not Indiana. I felt sad for him because his mom died. He coached a game the next day, probably to try to move on, but, of course, the press asked him about it after Georgia's loss to Florida.

Honestly, I could not imagine doing an interview the day after a loved one died, so I can understand that Tom might say something kind of odd. He said that it was difficult to go through and he hoped than any of us who have not gone through it would not have to do so.

Think about that. Technically, if you don't go through your mom or dad dying, that means they'll be the ones going through you dying. Or it means they are somehow strangers to you, and that's really much worse than having to deal with their deaths. Mostly, it's just a good reminder that, even if you go to work the day after your mom dies, you should skip the interview with reporters.

In the end, it's just reminder of our own (and everyone else's) mortality. We will all mourn or be mourned at some point. We don't really want a world where no one has to go through that, as it would mean we don't care about anyone and no one cares about us. Anyhow, the next time a loved one of yours passes on, I hope you remember that it's actually good that you feel sad. It's that whole idea of not asking for whom the bell tolls because it tolls for all of us.